About USISTF

The U.S.-Israel Science & Technology Foundation (USISTF) is a Washington, DC based 501c3 non-profit organization founded by a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Commerce and the Israel Ministry of Economy. The objectives are to facilitate joint research and development cooperation, scientific exchange that could lead to cooperative commercial activities, enable the development of emerging technology sectors, and assist in the adaptation of military technology for commercial use.

washingtons_inventions
washingtons_inventions
- 22 Feb 15, 9:03pm -


- 13 Feb 15, 7:56pm -


- 13 Feb 15, 7:56pm -


- 13 Feb 15, 7:56pm -


- 13 Feb 15, 7:56pm -


- 13 Feb 15, 7:56pm -
  • newHot stuff
    ANY sufficiently advanced technology, as Arthur C. Clarke once observed, is indistinguishable from magic. And one that seems routinely to be ascribed magical properties is graphene. It has been proposed for the manufacture of transistors and light…
    - 58 mins ago 30 Jul 15, 3:08pm -
  • newNo assembler required
    COMPUTING has always been a youngster’s game. The founders of Apple, Facebook, Google and Microsoft were in their teens or 20s when they started the businesses that made their fortunes. But even by the standards of Messrs Jobs, Zuckerberg, Brin,…
    - 58 mins ago 30 Jul 15, 3:08pm -
  • newThe last view of Pluto
    This picture of Pluto’s atmosphere, backlit by the sun, is a Parthian shot of the place taken on July 15th (but transmitted to Earth a week later) by New Horizons, NASA’s probe to the dwarf planet. It is a last, backward glance as the spacecra…
    - 58 mins ago 30 Jul 15, 3:08pm -
  • newThe big bug hunt
    “IT CAN be kind of addictive,” says Emily Stark, a Californian engineer who started looking for bugs in websites in her evenings after work. “There’s a lot of low-hanging fruit out there.”There are also a lot of Emily Starks out there,…
    - 58 mins ago 30 Jul 15, 3:08pm -
  • Seeing triple
    The eyes have itGIVING sight to robots is an important goal, but a tricky one. Most attempts use cameras that produce the sort of image a human being is used to, and then apply computing power to simplify it (for example, by searching for the edg…
    - 7 days ago 23 Jul 15, 2:47pm -
  • Spilling the beans
    “I’M THE one who looks the patient in the eye and tells them the trial is beneficial,” says Tim Crater, a research physician at the Hutchinson Clinic in Kansas. Dr Crater runs drug tests for large pharmaceutical firms. He says volunteers are…
    - 7 days ago 23 Jul 15, 2:47pm -
  • Looks could kill
    PEOPLE decide quickly how trustworthy a stranger is, based on what his face looks like. And experiments show that, regarding any particular individual, they generally come to the same conclusion. There really are, it seems, trustworthy and untrust…
    - 7 days ago 23 Jul 15, 2:47pm -
  • Flattening the slope
    ALZHEIMER’S disease is incurable, and only barely treatable. Drugs such as Aricept bring temporary relief, but nothing halts its onward march. There was therefore a lot of excitement, among researchers and journalists alike, in the lead-up to a…
    - 8 days ago 22 Jul 15, 8:32pm -
  • The optimistic gamble
    Be seeing you...IN 1959 a young astronomer called Frank Drake was working at the Green Bank radio observatory in West Virginia. Thinking about the capabilities of the 26-metre dish under construction there, he realised that, if it were used to tr…
    - 10 days ago 20 Jul 15, 10:30pm -
  • Beetles and bugs
    A bore for coffee farmersTHE coffee-berry borer is a pesky beetle. It is thought to destroy $500m-worth of unpicked coffee beans a year, thus diminishing the incomes of some 20m farmers. The borer spends most of its life as a larva, buried inside…
    - 14 days ago 16 Jul 15, 2:48pm -
  • No good deed goes unpunished
    IT BEGAN with some marshmallows. In the 1960s Walter Mischel, a psychologist then working at Stanford University, started a series of experiments on young children. A child was left alone for 15 minutes with a marshmallow or similar treat, with th…
    - 14 days ago 16 Jul 15, 2:48pm -
  • Their own devices
    BARBIE has come a long way since Mattel, a big American toy firm, launched the plastic doll in 1959. If children wanted to give the original version a voice, they had to provide it themselves. The latest Barbie, unveiled at the New York Toy Fair i…
    - 14 days ago 16 Jul 15, 2:48pm -
  • Volting ambition
    ELECTRIC aeroplanes have been busy breaking records. On July 10th Airbus’s E-Fan, piloted by Didier Esteyne, became the first twin-engined all-electric aircraft to cross the English Channel. At least, that is the firm’s version of events—for…
    - 14 days ago 16 Jul 15, 2:48pm -
  • Pluto’s icy mountains
    “WE ARE outbound from Pluto.” So said Alice Bowman, mission operations manager for New Horizons, an American space probe, when her charge resumed contact with Earth following its passage by the place on July 14th. After nine and a half years o…
    - 15 days ago 15 Jul 15, 9:08pm -
  • The final frontier
    ALL good things come to an end. And July 14th will see the finale of the Heroic Age of space exploration. On that day a visitor from Earth will fly past Pluto and head off into the Kuiper belt—the icy, rubble-strewn fringe of the sun’s sphere…
    - 21 days ago 9 Jul 15, 2:47pm -
  • Acoustic chatter
    FROM Bluetooth and Wi-Fi to FM and AM, wireless communication depends on electromagnetic waves—usually, radio waves. But as any motorist driving through a tunnel or under power lines can attest, such waves cannot always propagate properly past ever…
    - 21 days ago 9 Jul 15, 2:47pm -
  • Colourful chemotherapy
    Bushwillow: tree of enlightenmentAS A cell prepares to divide, tiny parts of its internal skeleton, known as microtubules, arrange themselves into a spindle that permits its complement of chromosomes to split into two bundles. These bundles will…
    - 21 days ago 9 Jul 15, 2:47pm -
  • Something fishy
    THOSE who fret about overfishing and those who fret about genetically modified (GM) food are often one and the same. Such people will soon be impaled on the horns of a dilemma if Johnathan Napier of Rothamsted Research, an agricultural establishme…
    - 21 days ago 9 Jul 15, 2:47pm -
  • Strike out
    CHECKING an airliner’s wings and fuselage for damage after it has been hit by lightning or suffered a bird strike is more than just a time-consuming nuisance. In the cut-throat world of commercial aviation, time is money, and a plane in a hangar is…
    - 28 days ago 2 Jul 15, 2:48pm -
  • Rapid unplanned disassembly
    FEW things are as spectacular as a successful rocket launch, but a failed one comes close. On June 28th SpaceX, an upstart rocketry firm founded by Elon Musk, an adventurous technology billionaire (see article), began what was to be its seventh un…
    - 28 days ago 2 Jul 15, 2:48pm -