International Science & Technology News

  • Astronauts complete spacewalk to retrofit space station

    Astronauts complete spacewalk to retrofit space station

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Two spacewalking astronauts ventured outside the International Space Station on Friday for a 6-1/2-hour spacewalk, the first of three to prepare the orbiting laboratory for future commercial space taxis and to tackle…
    - 3 days ago 24 Mar 17, 7:30pm -
  • SSL sues rival Orbital ATK over theft of trade secrets: lawsuit

    SSL sues rival Orbital ATK over theft of trade secrets: lawsuit

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Space Systems/Loral is suing rival Orbital ATK over an alleged theft of proprietary data and business plans for an in-space satellite servicing technology, according to a complaint filed on Thursday.
    - 5 days ago 23 Mar 17, 4:44pm -
  • Scientists use graphene to power 'electronic skin' that can feel

    Scientists use graphene to power 'electronic skin' that can feel

    LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists have found a way to power an experimental kind of electronic skin using solar energy in a further step towards the development of prosthetic limbs or robots with a sense of touch.
    - 5 days ago 23 Mar 17, 6:04am -
  • Revolutionary overhaul of dinosaur family tree proposed

    Revolutionary overhaul of dinosaur family tree proposed

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Some of the best-known dinosaurs, like Tyrannosaurus rex and Brontosaurus, may be headed for a divorce due to irreconcilable differences.
    - 5 days ago 22 Mar 17, 6:09pm -
  • Brazil ramps up domestic space satellite, rocket programs

    Brazil ramps up domestic space satellite, rocket programs

    KOUROU, French Guiana (Reuters) - Brazil is developing technology to send domestically-made satellites into space with its own rockets by the end of the decade, aerospace executives and officials said ahead of the launch of the nation's first defense…
    - 6 days ago 22 Mar 17, 4:36pm -
  • UK royals' sibling rivalry? Princess Anne says GMO crops have benefits

    UK royals' sibling rivalry? Princess Anne says GMO crops have benefits

    LONDON (Reuters) - Britain's Princess Anne may have sparked some royal sibling rivalry after saying genetically modified crops had real benefits to offer, putting her at odds with her older brother Charles who says they would be an environmental disa…
    - 6 days ago 22 Mar 17, 10:36am -
  • Ancient quakes may point to sinking risk for part of California coast

    Ancient quakes may point to sinking risk for part of California coast

    SEATTLE (Reuters) - The Big One may be overdue to hit California but scientists near Los Angeles have found a new risk for the area during a major earthquake: abrupt sinking of land, potentially below sea level.
    - 6 days ago 21 Mar 17, 11:35pm -
  • First U.S. bumble bee added to endangered species list

    First U.S. bumble bee added to endangered species list

    (Reuters) - The rusty patched bumble bee became the first wild bee in the continental United States to gain federal protection on Tuesday when it was added to the government's list of endangered and threatened species.
    - 6 days ago 21 Mar 17, 9:05pm -
  • Scientists launch campaign to restore Pluto to the planet club

    Scientists launch campaign to restore Pluto to the planet club

    (Reuters) - A team of scientists seeking to restore Pluto to planethood launched a campaign on Tuesday to broaden the astronomical classifications which led to its demotion to a "dwarf planet" a decade ago.
    - 6 days ago 21 Mar 17, 6:54pm -
  • Scientists find how using 'satnav' switches off parts of brain

    Scientists find how using 'satnav' switches off parts of brain

    LONDON (Reuters) - If you have long feared that using a "satnav" navigation system to get to your destination is making you worse at finding the way alone, research now suggests you may be right.
    - 7 days ago 21 Mar 17, 4:07pm -
  • Are laboratory mice too clean?

    Are laboratory mice too clean?

    THE hygiene hypothesis posits that certain diseases—notably asthma, eczema and type-1 diabetes—which are becoming more common than they once were, are caused in part by modern environments being too clean. The diseases in question result from mis…
    - 5 days ago 23 Mar 17, 3:44pm -
  • Assessing the importance of scientific work

    Assessing the importance of scientific work

    ONE role academic journals have come to play that was not, as it were, part of their original job-description of disseminating scientific results (see article), is as indicators of a researcher’s prowess, and thus determinants of academic careers.…
    - 5 days ago 23 Mar 17, 3:44pm -
  • A new way to classify dinosaurs

    A new way to classify dinosaurs

    AS EVERY school-aged aficionado of dinosaurs knows, those terrible reptiles are divided into two groups: the Saurischia and the Ornithischia—or, to people for whom that is all Greek, the lizard-hipped and the bird-hipped. The names go back 130 year…
    - 5 days ago 23 Mar 17, 3:44pm -
  • Powerful whirlwinds explain an odd feature of the Atacama desert

    Powerful whirlwinds explain an odd feature of the Atacama desert

    Crystal clear?THE Salar de Gorbea, at the southern end of the Atacama desert, in Chile, is one of the most hostile places on Earth. It receives virtually no rainfall and the little water it does host is contained in ponds both acidic and salty. It th…
    - 5 days ago 23 Mar 17, 3:44pm -
  • The findings of medical research are disseminated too slowly

    The findings of medical research are disseminated too slowly

    ON JANUARY 1st the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation did something that may help to change the practice of science. It brought into force a policy, foreshadowed two years earlier, that research it supports (it is the world’s biggest source of charita…
    - 5 days ago 23 Mar 17, 3:44pm -
  • The ecological impact of spiders

    The ecological impact of spiders

    A light snackARACHNOPHOBIA is a common and powerful fear. Spiders sit high in the pantheon of species that have an outsized terror-to-danger ratio. But, unsettling though they may be, the eight-legged do excel at keeping six-limbed pests in check. Th…
    - 12 days ago 16 Mar 17, 3:55pm -
  • A new job for DNA

    A new job for DNA

    WHAT lies beneath? It is a pressing question for those prospecting for oil, planning shale-fracturing or seeking geothermal-energy sites. Underground reservoirs of water, oil and gas are connected in extensive, circuitous networks that can change wit…
    - 12 days ago 16 Mar 17, 3:55pm -
  • An insect’s eye inspires a new camera for smartphones

    An insect’s eye inspires a new camera for smartphones

    Ready for my close-upMALES of a species called Xenos peckii have an unusual eye for the ladies. X. peckii is a member of the Strepsiptera, a group of insects that parasitise other insects. Its victim of choice is the paper wasp, inside the abdomen of…
    - 12 days ago 16 Mar 17, 3:55pm -
  • An outbreak of yellow fever in Brazil

    An outbreak of yellow fever in Brazil

    “ALL gone,” sighs Valmir Rossman as he scans the jungle surrounding his holding outside Santa Maria, a village in the state of Espírito Santo, north-east of Rio de Janeiro. Mr Rossman is a coffee farmer. Afternoons at his plantation used to echo…
    - 12 days ago 16 Mar 17, 3:55pm -
  • Strange signals from the sky may be signs of aliens

    Strange signals from the sky may be signs of aliens

    ON AUGUST 24th 2001 the Parkes Observatory, in Australia, picked up an unusual signal. It was a burst of radio waves coming more or less from the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud, a miniature galaxy that orbits the Milky Way. This burst was as…
    - 12 days ago 16 Mar 17, 3:55pm -
  • The rise of the medical selfie

    The rise of the medical selfie

    OF THE millions of photos shared online every day, which most faithfully represent their subjects? The popular #nofilter hashtag would suggest it is those that have not been digitally altered. But photographs of the same thing can differ greatly, dep…
    - 19 days ago 9 Mar 17, 4:30pm -
  • Aluminium batteries could let submarine drones range farther

    Aluminium batteries could let submarine drones range farther

    MUCH is made of the potential of flying drones. But drones are useful at sea, too. Unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), as they are known technically, are employed for things ranging from prospecting for oil and gas to naval warfare. Like their aeria…
    - 19 days ago 9 Mar 17, 4:30pm -